Vitamins: What are they and what do they do?

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Vitamins and minerals in kiwi

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Vitamins serve crucial functions in almost all bodily processes immune, hormonal and nervous systems and must be obtained from food or supplements as our bodies are unable to make vitamins. Fat-soluble vitamins are absorbed, vitamins and minerals in kiwi, together with fat from the intestine, into the circulation.

Any disease or disorder that affects the absorption of fat, such as coeliac disease, could lead to a deficiency of these vitamins. Once absorbed into the circulation these vitamins are carried to the liver where they are stored. Vitamins A, D, E and K make up the fat-soluble vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins, such as Vitamin C and the B vitamins are stored in the body for only a brief period of vitamins and minerals in kiwi and are then excreted by the kidneys.

The one exception to this is vitamin B12, which is stored in the liver. Water-soluble vitamins need to be taken vitamins and minerals in kiwi. Vitamin C ascorbic acid and the B complex group make up the nine water-soluble vitamins. The B complex group comprises of vitamins:.

Vitamins contain no useful energy for the body, but they do link and regulate the sequence of metabolic reactions that release energy from the food we consume, vitamins and minerals in kiwi.

Vitamins cannot be made in the body and must be obtained in our diet. A well-balanced diet provides an adequate quantity of all vitamins regardless of age and level of physical activity. The recommended daily requirements of vitamins for men, women are shown in the Table below NHS Direct Online [1]. These requirements should be easily met if a balanced diet is adhered to. There are groups that may be at greater risk of developing vitamin deficiencies than others e.

For these groups, there may tv antenna vertical stacking plans advantages in taking a general or specific vitamin supplement following advice from a doctor or nutritionist. Fat-soluble vitamins should not be consumed in excess as they are stored in the body and an excess can result in side effects. An vitamins and minerals in kiwi of vitamin A may result in irritability, weight loss, dry itchy vitamins and minerals in kiwi in children and nausea, headache, diarrhoea in adults.

An excess of water-soluble vitamins should not result in any side effects as they will disperse in the body fluids and voided in the urine. Exercise increases the production of free radicals and a build-up of free radicals increases the potential for cellular damage to many biological substances. Available research indicates that if supplements can be beneficial in combating free radicals then vitamin E may be the most effective.

Many vitamins and minerals interact, working alongside each other in groups e. B6 pyridoxine B1 thiamine B2 riboflavin B12 niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamins and minerals in kiwi, folic acid and cobalamin Vitamin sources, uses and deficiency problems Vitamin A fat-soluble Sources: Dairy products, eggs, liver. Can be converted by the body from the beta-carotene found in green vegetables, carrots and liver.

Deficiency leads to Keratinisation of the nasal and respiratory passage epithelium, night blindness Vitamin B1 thiamine water-soluble Sources: Yeast, egg yolk, liver, wheatgerm, nuts, red meat and cereals Uses: Carbohydrate metabolism Deficiency leads to: Fatigue, irritability, loss of appetite; severe deficiency can lead to beri-beri Vitamin B2 riboflavin water-soluble Sources: Dairy products, liver, vegetables, eggs, cereals, fruit, yeast Uses: Intracellular metabolism Deficiency leads to: Painful tongue and fissures to the corners of the mouth, chapped lips Vitamin Vitamins and minerals in kiwi water-soluble Sources: Liver, red meat, dairy products and fish Uses: Essential for manufacturing of genetic material in cells.

Involved in the production of erythrocytes Deficiency leads to: Green vegetables and fruit Uses: Essential for the maintenance of bones, teeth and gums, ligaments and blood vessels. It is also necessary for ensuring a normal immune response to infection Deficiency leads to: Scurvy Vitamin D fat-soluble Sources: Fish liver oils, dairy produce.

Vitamin D is formed in the skin when it is exposed to sunlight Uses: Has a role in the absorption of calcium, underdeveloped sinuses and asthma is essential for the maintenance of healthy bones Deficiency leads to: Rickets Vitamin E fat-soluble Sources: Pure vegetable oils; wheatgerm, wholemeal bread vitamins and minerals in kiwi cereals, egg yolk, nuts sunflower seeds Uses: Protects tissues against damage; promotes normal growth and development; helps in normal red blood cell formation Deficiency leads to: May cause muscular dystrophy Vitamin K fat-soluble Sources: Used by the liver for the formation of prothrombin Deficiency leads to: Bleeding due to delayed clotting times caused by lack of clotting factors.

Patients may show signs of bruising easily and have nosebleeds. Vitamins Vitamins serve crucial functions in almost all bodily processes immune, hormonal and nervous systems and must be obtained from food or supplements as our bodies are unable to make vitamins.

Fat Soluble Vitamins Fat-soluble vitamins are absorbed, together with fat from the intestine, into the circulation, vitamins and minerals in kiwi. Water Soluble Vitamins Water-soluble vitamins, such as Vitamin C and the B vitamins are stored in the body for only a brief period of time and are then excreted by the kidneys. The B complex group comprises of vitamins: Daily Requirements Vitamins contain no useful energy for the body, but they do link and regulate the sequence of metabolic reactions that release energy from the food we consume.

 

Vitamins and minerals in kiwi

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